Watering southwestern landscapes

R. L. Rhodes
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No one needs to tell you that summers in the Southwest tend to be hot and dry, but according to the national Climate Prediction Center, the residents of Southwestern states should expect drought conditions to persist through July 2013 this year. use the following tips to help keep your landscape healthy, even when water is scarce.

  • With municipal water restrictions likely in many areas, you’ll want to capture any spare precipitation that falls. Installing a rain barrel will let you store up water for the long stretches when a rainy day is nowhere to be found.
  • A spacious turf grass lawn may not be ideal for every situation. If you find yourself struggling to revive a dying lawn year in and year out, consider xeriscaping, a set of landscape management practices built around native plants and water conservation practices.
  • The desert willow (Chilopsis linearis) and Monterrey oak (Quercus polymorpha) are two drought-tolerant trees native to Southwestern landscapes; for a drought-resistant shrub, try blue juniper (Juniperus scopulorum).

Do you live in another part of the country? Go here to see all of the regions covered , as well as more tips for everyone.

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