Plants That Can Take the Heat

Renee Valdes
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 sunsplash coreopsis

Even in the heat of summer, it’s not too late to plant colorful perennial blooms in your garden. By investing in hardy, heat-loving perennials, you’ll be rewarded with color, depth and texture year after year. 

When it seems like your plants are limping along, give your garden a lift with echinacea (coneflowers) and coreopsis.

Try the colorful new VIVA! varieties Sombrero Echinacea and Sunsplash Coreopsis in an array of colors including hot yellows and fiery oranges. Our Community has more information about the newest innovations in VIVA! flower breeding.

lantana blossoms

Old standbys such as lantana and verbena can take the hottest corner of your garden when planted there. These bright, colorful and heat-loving flowers will bring blooms until the first frost. Butterflies will flock to your garden when you plant these.

russian sage blooms

You can also add texture to your garden with heat-tolerant plants such as sedum and Russian sage. While Russian sage resembles lavender and smells like sage when its leaves are crushed, it’s an inedible border plant and even deer don’t like it. When planted in a sunny portion of your garden, its purple blooms come alive in the heat. 

You could also add low-maintenance sedum, considered a succulent. Try Autumn Fire Stonecrop Sedum, which comes in like clockwork each year and then watch it bloom into the fall.

If you are searching for heat-hardy herbs to plant, try rosemary and lavender. These pungent herbs make for a perfect companion when placed near your grill.

Protect your investment and help your plants thrive by feeding them the right fertilizer and layering your garden with mulch. Not sure how much mulch you will need? Check out our handy mulch calculator tool

More heat-loving Perennials:

  • Gaillardia
  • Agastache
  • Daylilies
  • Black-eyed Susan
  • Hosta
  • Heuchera

Hose timer

When the heat’s on, there are different ways to keep your garden cool, everything from hose timers to soaker hoses. Hose timers can be useful because you can water an area just when it needs it with simple programming.

If you select a hose timer with two outlets, you can water separate areas at the same time or at different intervals. You can also attach a soaker hose to one while freeing up the other to a sprinkler.

More options for keeping your plants well-watered:

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