Plant Perennials in Your Garden

Lynn Coulter
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coreopsis

Each spring, beautiful, dependable perennials pop back up in our gardens. Choose plants that bloom in succession, and you can enjoy a long-lasting flower show. Since perennials make a great foundation for your garden, try growing them with trees, roses, and other flowering shrubs.

Add annuals and bulbs for a wide variety of textures, forms, and colors.

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Before you plant, prepare a bed for your plants by loosening the soil and removing weeds, grass, and any debris. Mix in plenty of organic matter to help the perennials develop deep, strong roots. A soil test kit can help you determine whether your soil needs fertilizer or other amendments.

Hosta

When you go shopping, read plant tags and labels, and select plants that match the growing conditions in your garden. Think about how much sun or shade your garden gets, and whether your soil stays moist or tends toward drought.

Be sure to look for perennials that will thrive in your hardiness zone, too. Use one of our lists below to get started.

Perennials for Northern gardens

Perennials for Southern gardens (including the South Texas Valley area)

Perennials for Western gardens (including Western desert regions)

Perennials for South Florida gardens

Images from top to bottom: Coreopsis, gaura, hosta

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