Fall For Bulbs: Try Our Garden Club Quiz

Lynn Coulter
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fall for bulbs: try our garden club quiz

Image by Shebeko/Shutterstock

We often refer to “bulbs” when we mean a large group of perennials that includes corms, tubers, rhizomes, and true bulbs.

 

How did you score on last week’s quiz?

Congratulations to Garden Club reader Daniel Burrington, the first person to send in the right answers. They were: 1. Armistice Day; 2. Memorial Day honors those who died in battle or from battle-related injuries; 3. Veterans Day honors all American veterans.; 4. True; 5. We’ll take true or false, although Britain actually calls their day Remembrance Sunday; 5. General George S. Patton.

This week, we’re going to fall for bulbs–literally, because you can plant spring-flowering bulbs from fall into early winter. If you can’t wait for their beautiful colors and fragrances, don’t worry. You can force bulbs indoors for early blooms, so you’ll have brilliant red amaryllis for Christmas, or sweet-scented paperwhites by Valentine’s Day.

Let’s see what you know about these tiny storehouses of flower-power. Send us your answers to the questions, below, but resist that urge to look them up on Google!

1. True or false: you should plant most bulbs with the pointy ends up.

2. True or false: it’s perfectly okay to “pre-chill” your bulbs in the refrigerator before forcing them.

3. _____ are especially suited for forcing in water. (Hint: there’s more than one correct answer.)

4. Bulbs are almost complete embryos, with  ____ and _____ inside.

5.  Striped ______ first appeared as a result of a viral infection.

6. Two of the most fragrant bulbs you can force are _____ and _______.

7. In the 1600s, a single tulip bulb was sometimes traded for acres of land. This madness for flowers became known as ________.

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