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Ask the Expert: Proven Winners Inspires Better, Brighter Gardens

Lucy Mercer
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Proven Winners plants | The Home Depot's Garden Club

Select premium perennials, shrubs and even vegetables from the comfort of your couch this season when you choose from the Proven Winners line available in the Garden Center and online

Proven Winners plants are trialed and tested to be easy to grow and maintain and have abundant, long-lasting and colorful blooms and foliage. Look for hundreds of varieties available online and in store this year.

When you order Proven Winners plants from The Home Depot, they will ship within two days from the Four Star Greenhouse in Carleton, Michigan.

Here’s a sneak peek for 2019:

Keep in mind that plants are seasonally available and some are not available to ship to all regions.

Lemon Coral Sedum from Proven Winners | The Home Depot's Garden Club

Lemon coral sedum is a citrus-y bright succulent filler for containers. Cold hardy to zone 7, this annual can handle brutal summer heat. (Don’t know your USDA hardiness zone? Use this chart to find your zone.)

It asks for nothing more than average soil, water and sun, and will good-naturedly tolerate a part sun situation. Give this garden workhorse a try in a bed, border or container.

 

Proven Winners Shadowland Hosta | The Home Depot's Garden Club

Proven Winner’s Hosta of the Year for 2019 is Shadowland ‘Autumn Frost,’ which features on-trend variegated frosty blue leaves and extra wide, bright yellow margins. It sends out creamy white and lavender flowers in summer. 

As hostas go, ‘Autumn Frost’ is medium-sized, growing to 10-12 inches in height and spreading up to 24 inches across. This perennial thrives in zones 3 to 9. Plant hostas as soon as the ground is workable in spring and site in part shade to full shade. Hosta performs well in containers, too.

Proven Winners Pugster Butterfly Bush | The Home Depot's Garden Club

‘Pugster Blue’ butterfly bush, buddleia, is just two feet tall and wide, but sends out stunning blooms typical of a much larger plant. 

This long-blooming pollinator magnet is hardy in zones 5 through 9, drought tolerant and fragrant. Southern gardeners can grow a butterfly bush in containers, just keep it watered. Give ‘Pugster Blue’ full sun and add plenty of organic matter to the soil when planting.

This utility player can be used in borders, as a focal point or massed in a large space for an explosion of color. 

Proven Winners Superbells Holy Cow | The Home Depot's Garden Club

Superbells Holy Cow! calibrachoa is not a shy flower. This vibrant pink annual sends out cascades of petunia-like flowers all summer long. Calibrachoas are heat tolerant, and will rebloom throughout the summer.

Tip for planting calibrachoas: in containers, allow the top of the soil to dry before watering again. Calibrachoas don’t like wet feet, preferring well-draining soil.

Catmint from Proven Winners | The Home Depot's Garden Club

Catmint ‘Cat’s Pajamas’ is for all lavender lovers. While not deeply fragrant like the favorite herb, it delivers an easy-growing punch of perennial purple throughout the summer.

This catmint is drought tolerant, heat tolerant, deer-resistant and attractive to bees, butterflies and hummingbirds. It’s hardy in zones 3 to 8 and prefers an alkaline soil. If your garden soil tends to the acidic, prepare the flower bed with lime or ashes before planting.

Amazel Basil from Proven Winners | The Home Depot's Garden Club

‘Amazel Basil’ is not just flowery marketing speak. This basil was an outstanding performer in Garden Club editors’ Zone 7b gardens this past summer. Amazel is deeply fragrant, with fat, floppy leaves perfect for pesto and pots of sauce. 

In the garden, it’s seed sterile, which means it never sends up flower stalks. That means all the plant’s energy is focused on producing fresh, gorgeous herbal leaves for your summer kitchen creations. 

It’s also resistant to downy mildew, a persistent problem for other basil varieties. 

Got questions about this article or any other garden topic? Go here now to post your gardening ideas, questions, kudos or complaints. We have gardening experts standing by to help you!