6 Bright Ways to Fill a Fall Window Box

Lucy Mercer
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Fall Windowbox | The Home Depot's Garden Club

Window boxes bring the garden up close and at eye level to your house. Think of window boxes as miniature gardens, easy to change with the seasons and highlight the best of your garden throughout the year. 

Window boxes can be placed on the house by, of course, windows, but they are just as easily installed on a porch railing.

As you decide what to put in the window box, look to what’s growing in the rest of your landscape.

The choice of materials can be as simple and low-maintenance as pumpkins, bittersweet berries, and dried cornstalks.

Following are five more favorite fall combinations for your window box display.

 

Fall Windowbox | The Home Depot's Garden Club

1. Flowering kale. Rich purples and burgundies are just right for fall. This combination uses cordyline as a thriller, with purple pansies and a small kale as filler. 

No matter your plant choices, you can’t go wrong using the thriller, filler, spiller recipe when building out any window box.

 

Fall Windowbox | The Home Depot's Garden Club

2. Vibrant mums. They are everywhere in fall, and for a reason: You can’t beat the visual impact of a mass of mum blooms in red, yellow, orange or purple.

Tip: Place the mums in the window box, leaving them in the pots they came in. Group the pots as close as you can and just cover any bare spots with moss or burlap. 

 

Fall Windowbox | The Home Depot's Garden Club

3. Kick it up a notch with ornamental peppers. These red beauties bring fire alongside the icy coolness of flowering kale. Just nestle them in their containers into the window box.

 

Fall Windowbox | The Home Depot's Garden Club

4. Edibles like Swiss chard. The stems of these greens, particularly rainbow chard, light up in morning and afternoon sun. 

 

Fall Windowbox with Pansies | The Home Depot's Garden Club

5. Pansies. The all-purpose pansy consistently delights with bright colors and happy faces as nights grow colder. Pansies are cold-hardy and take brief temperature dips into the 20s and still bloom.

You can extend the life of pansies by insulating them with straw or mulch when the weather cools.

 

 

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